December 2014 Coupons

If you bring in an order that totals more than $12.00, you receive $3.00 off your incoming order. Offer expires January 5, 2015.

You must bring in a printed copy of this coupon with incoming order to receive the discount.

Crest Cleaners December 2014 Coupons

If you bring in an order that totals more than $16.00, you receive $4.00 off your incoming order. Offer expires January 5, 2015.

You must bring in a printed copy of this coupon with incoming order to receive the discount.

Crest Cleaners December 2014 Coupons

Get 1 shirt laundered for free, when you bring in 4 or more. Offer expires January 5, 2015.

You must bring in a printed copy of this coupon with incoming order to receive the discount.

Crest Cleaners December 2014 Coupons

Common Laundry mistakes – part 1

Too much detergent

Counter-intuitively, more soap does not make for cleaner clothes. Rather, it can make them grimier as he soap residue fades colour and attracts more dirt. It can also lead to bacteria build-up in the machine and on clothes, especially in areas where the excess soap holds dirt and doesn’t get washed away, like pleats or collars. Detergent build-up even encourages odor.

Leaving wet clothes in the machine

It can not only lead to stinky clothes and a smelly machine, it can allow mildew to start forming, which can trigger an allergy or asthma attack.

You’d have to leave your clothes sitting wet in the washer for about 24 hours before mildew is likely to start forming. But, for smells’ sake, it’s best to remove clothes from the machine as soon as you can. If you don’t have time to hang them out, try placing them in a plastic basket in a ventilated area or at very least open the washing machine door to let air in.

Overloading your machine

It is tempting to clean your basket full of clothes in one fell swoop to save on time. But, it means the “cleaning” part isn’t really effective and it can also damage the machine. To clean successfully, clothes have to be able to move around inside the drum, so that water and detergent can distribute evenly, lift stains and shake the dirt free. When you overload your machine, you cramp its style in this sense and also strain its suspension and bearings from overwork.

Is club soda a miracle stain remover?

Does club soda really work on spills? Everyone “knows” club soda is the ultimate remedy for instant stain removal, but is it really all it’s cracked up to be? Our 107-year-old professional trade association, the Drycleaning & Laundry Institute (DLI), recently completed an in-depth study of the merits of club soda versus plain old water in stain removal, and as members, we’re pleased to share their findings. The short answer is “yes” club soda can be a big help in the short term, but “no” it is not the end-all, be-all stain removal miracle it is made out to be.
When applied immediately to 10 commonplace food stains DLI tested, both club soda and water removed anywhere from some to most of the stain. However, neither treatment will completely remove the stains and if left untreated the remaining stain residues can become permanent stains over time or when the garment is cleaned. On the 10 common spills that DLI’s stain removal experts used for the test, they found that after blotting a spill with either club soda or water some or most visible traces of the substance were removed; however, an analysis under ultraviolet light showed that at least a portion of nearly every stain remained after club soda or water was used.
Therefore, although it is best to try and rinse out the stain with water immediately after contact with the clothing, it is then also advisable to take the garment to a professional cleaner who can completely remove the last traces. Point out to the cleaner the area of the stain, the type of staining substance, and what attempts you made to reduce the initial spillage. If this is not done as soon as possible, the invisible remaining residue can oxidize over time and leave a permanent discoloration later, which in many cases on some fabrics cannot be removed.
For Best Results, Act Fast When it comes time to remove the stain, the chances are greatly increased if club soda (or water) is used to rinse the stain before it dries. After it dries the degree of effectiveness drops considerably. In a coffee stain, for example, there may be sugar residue present that you may not be able to see, but it can carmelize during the drying or pressing processes, leaving a yellowish stain. A stain removal expert can remove this residue if he or she knows the stain was there in the first place. It is always recommended that customers mention any spills or attempts to remove stains at the counter. This way we will be better prepared to restore your garment to a like-new appearance.
There are also some stains that club soda actually makes worse. Ballpoint ink is almost always made up of water and solvent components. If water or club soda is used to remove this kind of stain, it could set the stain permanently into the fabric. So, with ballpoint stains, it is best to leave them to the professional stain removers.
Club soda or water will hold the stain off until you can get the garment to a cleaner: we can usually remove the stains completely if you bring it in without delay.

Store Updates

We want to keep you updated on our stores and information that may impact you and your dry cleaning needs.

Store Closing
The following store closed on May 31, 2014.

Crest Cleaners
1242 Dixon Blvd.
Cocoa, FL 32922

If you had any clothes that were at that store they are available for pick up at 30 S. Fiske Blvd. in Cocoa or you can call 321.636.0473 for more information.

Store Opening
We also have a new store opening sometime in June. The new location is 5525 Porada Drive, Unit 101 in Melbourne. It will include seamstress and drive-thru services. Check back for more information for grand opening dates.

You can always check in for the latest information about your favorite Crest Cleaners by checking out our Facebook page.

Benefits of Professional Drycleaning – part 3

Preservation: Many dry cleaners specialize in the preservation of wedding gowns, christening gowns, and other family heirlooms. Preservation is a special type of storage that helps prolong the life of a garment for years and years. Cleaners often say that they aren’t just preserving a customer’s garment, they’re preserving a memory.
Quality: This is what dry cleaning experts should provide and you should expect from them. Accept no less.

Restoration: In addition to preservation, dry cleaners may specialize in the restoration of old wedding gowns, heirloom items, and antique textiles. These items often are very delicate and require great care. Restoration specialists have the expertise to take in these items, although the level they can restore them to depends on their condition at the time they are brought in. It is not uncommon, though, for a cleaner to restore a wedding gown originally worn by a bride-to-be’s grandmother well enough that the bride can wear it in her own wedding.

Stain removal: Dry cleaners use complex procedures and special stain removal chemicals to remove stains. Stains are divided into two major categories: solvent-soluble stains and water-soluble stains. Different stains require different treatments, which stain removal technicians are trained to administer. Why risk a disaster using an over-the-counter “all-purpose” stain removal product or trying a “home remedy” when you could rely on your drycleaner’s expert stain removal abilities?

Technology: Dry cleaners are on top of the latest cleaning and fabric technologies.

Upholstery: Dry cleaning professionals aren’t just clothes care specialists, they are textile care specialists. Some cleaners will even come into your home if you’d like to clean the upholstery of your couch, chairs, and other furniture. These cleaners have special, portable equipment that allows them to clean upholstery and draperies.

Value: A good value is what dry cleaners provide their customers through quality work, excellent customer service, and the extra free time to do the things they’d rather be doing instead of washing and ironing clothes.

Wetcleaning: Wetcleaning is a gentle form of cleaning that cleaners may choose to process sensitive textiles such as wool, silk, rayon, and linen. It gives dry cleaners more flexibility in processing items that may not withstand a dry cleaning process or that have soils that would be better removed in water. For example, many items, such as wedding gowns, are often trimmed with plastic beads or sequins that may dissolve or discolor in dry cleaning but generally perform well in wetcleaning. Items with large water-soluble stains are also more likely to come clean in a wetcleaning process.

eXtend the life of your garments: Contrary to the belief of some, frequent cleaning does not damage clothes. Frequent cleaning extends the life of a garment by removing stains and ground-in dirt and soils.

Yellowing: Frequent cleaning removes stains that, if left untreated, could oxidize and cause yellowing. Exposure to heat or the passage of time can cause stains from food, beverages, and other oily substances to oxidize and turn yellow or brown, much the way a peeled apple turns brown after exposure to air. Once they become yellow or brown, these stains become much more difficult to remove and often cannot be removed.

Zip in and out: That’s how long it takes you to drop off and pick up your dry cleaning. Again, convenience is paramount to good dry cleaning.

Benefits of Professional Drycleaning – part 2

Inspection: Before they return a garment to you, quality dry cleaners conduct an inspection to make sure your order has met their own and your expectations. If they spot a problem, the garment gets sent back to receive further attention. Safeguards like this help ensure that your clothes will look their best when you come to pick them up.

Just right: That’s how your clothes will look when you pick them up from your dry cleaning professional.

Knowledge of fabrics and fashions: You may know what rayon, silk, and cotton are, but what about angora, faille or seersucker? There are numerous fabrics and fibers that dry cleaners must know about in order to care best for the clothes they receive. Each fabric can respond positively or negatively depending on the treatment administered.

Laundry: Dry cleaning professionals also have commercial laundry departments where they process shirts, cotton pants, and other items. With the convenience and superior level of pressing that comes with commercial laundry, it won’t just be your dry clean-only clothes that look like a million bucks. Your business casual and casual attire will look their best, too.

Moths, safeguards from: Clean clothes are the first step to preventing moth and other insect damage. Insects can damage clothes either directly or indirectly. Direct damage is caused by a group of insects feeding directly on a fabric. Indirect damage is caused when insects feed on spilled food or perspiration on the fabric. Moths attack the garment directly, especially wool and wool blends. Some cleaners provide mothproofing as a service. Mothproofing is a chemical treatment given to fabrics that provides protection from insects without leaving the objectionable odors that mothballs do.

Neckties: Ties are often made of delicate fabrics (such as silk) and require special care. Whether you’ve spilled gravy on your favorite tie or are just looking to spruce it up, a high-quality dry cleaner is best equipped to clean it.

Odor removal: Some dry cleaning establishments specialize in odor removal and flood and fire restoration of water- or smoke-damaged items. These dry cleaners use ozone generators to do an ozone treatment. The contact between ozone and the odors embedded in the textiles causes oxidation to reoccur, resulting in the elimination of the odors and the release of oxygen. This is a safe and effective process.

Benefits of Professional Dry Cleaning – part 1

What are the benefits of dry cleaning?

Alterations: Professional dry cleaners are full-service clothing care specialists. Alterations are one of the many services they may offer in addition to dry cleaning your clothes.

Buttons: Dry cleaners repair loose buttons or sew on new ones, if necessary.

Convenience: All you have to do is drop your clothes off and pick them up. Your dry cleaner takes care of the rest. Why waste hours doing laundry and ironing when you get quality and convenience with dry cleaning?

Dry cleaning, the process itself: Dry cleaning uses fluids to remove soils and stains from fabrics. Among the advantages of dry cleaning is its ability to dissolve grease and oils in a way that water cannot. Natural fibers such as wools and silks dry clean beautifully, but can shrink, distort, and lose color when washed in water. Synthetic fibers like polyester also respond well to dry cleaning, whereas they can retain oily stains after washing. Dry cleaning helps to return garments to a “like-new” condition using precautions to prevent shrinkage, loss of color, and change of texture or finish.

Expertise: From fashions and fabrics to stain removal to the latest cleaning technologies, dry cleaners have the expertise to clean your clothes right. Why do it yourself or settle for a second-rate job from a so-called “home dry cleaning kit” when you could trust it to an expert?

Finishing: Thanks to special pressing equipment, professional finishing gives garments a crisp, wrinkle-free, like-new appearance that can’t be beat. There are no rumples or creases out of place. Plus, by taking your clothes to the dry cleaner, you don’t have to spend your weekend standing over an ironing board and a hot iron.

Garment storage: Have you got too many clothes and too little space? Some cleaners provide garment storage for out-of-season items. The garments are stored in a vault, which offers protection from insects, fire, burglary, flood, and mildew damage. Furs used to be the primary storage item, but today dry cleaners receive woolens, household items, and other items to store as well.

Household textiles: Dry cleaners don’t just clean clothes. Many dry cleaners also process household items such as blankets, comforters, decorative pillows, rugs, and even upholstery and draperies.

Clean Ideas: End-of-Summer Cleanup

Tips for getting things ready for storage

Before you get caught up in all the back-to-school activities, spend some end-of-summer time returning items to their best possible state before you store them away. This will prove to be a time saver when you want to use them again next spring.

  • Musty beach towels: Launder, using the hottest water that’s safe for the fabric. Add a small amount of fabric softener to the final rinse. Machine-dry thoroughly.
  • Sandy sleeping bag: Turn the bag inside out. If the sand is damp, let the bag air out until the sand is dry. Shake the bag to remove as much loose sand as possible; then brush or vacuum away the remaining residue. If the bag is soiled, clean according to the sleeping bag’s care label instructions.
  • Muddy tennis shoes: Let the mud dry completely. Then take the shoes outside and bang the soles together to remove as much of the dried mud as possible. Using a solution of warm water and hand dishwashing liquid and an old toothbrush, scrub gently to remove the remaining dirt. For stubborn dirt marks, scrub with a nylon pad. Wipe with a damp sponge or damp paper towels. Stuff the tennis shoes with clean paper towels and let them air-dry.
  • Grungy plastic tablecloths: A wipe-down with a soapy sponge may clean the top of the tablecloth, but not the flannel backing. To clean the whole thing, machine-wash, using the gentle cycle. Machine-dry on the delicate cycle for about 15 minutes. This is just enough time to remove the creases caused by machine washing, but not long enough to harm the vinyl. If the cloth is still damp, line-dry.
  • Grubby molded-resin outdoor furniture: Clean with a mild detergent and water. Avoid abrasive powders, chlorine bleaches and silicone cleaners.
  • Soiled outdoor cushions: Acrylic, polyester and cotton fabrics should be spot-cleaned by sponging with a solution of liquid dishwashing detergent and lukewarm water. Rinse with clear water and air-dry.
  • Dirty plastic pool toys: Mix 3/4 cup of chlorine bleach per gallon of warm water. Soak the prewashed toys for five minutes. Rinse and then air-dry. If the toys aren’t used during the winter, store them in a closed container so they’ll stay clean and dust-free.

How to clean sleeping bags

Sleeping bags can usually be washed, but because many contain down or fiber filling, you should always check the care instructions before cleaning. Sleeping bags should be washed separately on a gentle cycle. Add detergent to the washer and partially fill with warm water. Submerge the sleeping bag in the water to expel air, then allow the washer to finish filling.

Periodically stop the washer, open the lid, and press air from the sleeping bag to help ensure good cleaning. Tumble dry at regular temperatures. You may try adding a clean tennis ball to the dryer to fluff up the filling. If you find the sleeping bag to be too bulky for a home washing machine, you may try taking it to your cleaner for professional cleaning.

 

Drying Pointers

Drying is just as important as washing, and though many of us simply toss the wet clothing into the dryer, there are ways to improve your look and protect your wardrobe. When it comes time to dry your next load, try following these easy steps to get less wrinkles, shorter drying times, and safer drying.

Sort by fiber content and weight: Heavier garments might require more heat and time than light garments. To get the most out of your machine, and your time, sort loads accordingly.

Do not overload dryer: Overloading causes more wrinkles and longer drying times. It can also overburden your dryer and shorten its life.

Select drying temperature by fiber content: Some fibers, such as polyesters and acrylics, will be damaged by too much heat. When in doubt, it is best to dry on low heat and air dry to finish.

Fold or hang garments immediately after drying: This helps ward off wrinkles and keep your clothes looking fresh. This can also help garments dry out if there is any water remaining after the cycle.

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